The Team


 

The research of Christoph Bublitz focuses on the legal regulation of the human mind and legal implications of developments in psychology and neuroscience. He is a leading figure in the field of neuroethics, has written extensively on law and ethics of neurointerventions and psychotherapy and was awarded prizes for his work on legal and ethical problems of psychotherapy and the human rights protection of the mind. Recently edited volumes pertaining to this project include The Law and Ethics of Freedom of Thought (Palgrave, 2021, with Marc Blitz) and Empirische Ethik: Grundlagentexte aus Philosophie und Psychologie (Suhrkamp, 2020, with Norbert Paulo).

Chiara Caporuscio is a postdoc working in philosophy and medical ethics at Charité and OvGU. Her research interests focus on the ethics and epistemology of psychedelic experiences, altered states of consciousness, failures of self-knowledge, and delusional belief formation.

Sascha Benjamin Fink is Junior-professor for Neurophilosophy at the Otto-von-Guericke-University and member of the Center for Behavioral Brain Sciences in Magdeburg. His research focuses on epistemic issues surrounding consciousness, especially research on the neural correlates of consciousness (Fink 2016; 2020; Fink, Kob, and Lyre 2021). He has published philosophical analyses of psychedelically induced phenomena like ego-dissolution (Fink 2020), epistemic difficulties concerning introspection (Fink 2018), and social and political dimensions of transformative experiences (Fink 2019; 2020).

Astrid Gieselmann, research fellow and resident at the Charité, brings to the project her extensive experience in medical ethics.

Nicolas Langlitz was the first author in Science & Technology Studies to chronicle and analyze the revival of psychedelic research at a time when it was still in its preclinical stage (Langlitz 2006; 2009; 2010; 2017). His monograph Neuropsychedelia: The Revival of Hallucinogen Research since the Decade of the Brain (University of California Press, 2012) examines historically and ethno-graphically how psychedelics returned from the underground into academic neuropsychopharma-cology laboratories. He has also worked on the ethics of psychotherapy (Die Zeit der Psychoanalyse, Suhrkamp, 2005).

Christopher Poppe is a postdoc at Charité. As a clinical psychologist and medical ethicist, his interests are the empirical ethics of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy, patient autonomy, side effects and harm reduction in the therapeutic interaction, as well as ethics of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy at the end of life.

Dimitris Repantis is a psychiatrist and psychotherapist and Co-Lead of the Psychedelic Substances Research Group in the Department of Psychiatry and Neurosciences of the Charité. His research focuses on clinical uses of psychedelics and he has run clinical trials with several psychedelics (psilocybin, MDMA and 5-MeO-DMT). He is  particularly interested in the ethical aspects of psychedelic research and therapy as well as  psychiatry and psychotherapy in general and has worked on cognitive enhancement and the ethics of traumatherapy in previous projects.

Torsten H. Voigt is a professor of sociology and the dean of the Faculty of Arts and Humanities at RWTH Aachen University. His research interests are in science and technology studies with a special focus on genetics and neuroscience, medical sociology, diversity studies, social and critical theory, and public engagement in science and technology. He is particularly interested in the use of biotechnologies and biomedicine in order to tackle social problems. His work on health and illness, societal influences on and social implications of biotechnologies, and epistemological foundations of science has been published in Sociology, Science, Technology and Human Values, Nature Genetics, the European Journal of Human Genetics and featured in Harvard Business Review, Forbes, CNN, NPR, and Bloomberg Businessweek among others.

Minsu Yoo is a research fellow and PhD student at RWTH Aachen University. Her research interests center upon the innovation paradigm within psychopharmaceutical industries and institutional geographies of healthcare practices.